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WWII Nazi German SS Eight Year Long Service Medal SS Dienstauszeichenungen
Item #: VF4933

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Roughly 38mm, diameter, die struck bronze alloy construction, third class award with a bronze wash, features a raised outer lip with central, embossed, SS runes encircled by an embossed oak-leaf wreath which is superimposed over a large, embossed, static swastika on a subtly textured background field to the obverse. The reverse has the embossed, block Latin script with SS runes, "Für Treue Dienste in der SS", (For Loyal Service in the SS), superimposed over a large numeral "8", also on a subtly textured background field. The medal ring and the correct, tear drop shaped, suspension loop are both intact and the medal comes complete with a piece of original ribbed, moire cornflower blue rayon ribbon.
On January 30TH 1938 Adolf Hitler introduced a series of four long service medals for award to loyal, long serving members of the SS-Verfügungstruppen, (SS-Special Purpose Troops), the SS-Totenkopfverbände, (SS-Death’s Head Units) and the SS-Junkerschulen, (SS-Officer Candidates Schools). Eligible service time for bestowal of one of the awards was counted from the reforming of the NSDAP, Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, (National Socialist German Worker’s Party), on February 24TH 1925 and time served between 1925 and 1933, during the Kampfzeit, (Time of Struggle), and military service time were counted as double. The four classes consisted of the first class award for twenty-five years service, the second class for twelve years service, the third class for eight years service and the fourth class for four years service. Only EM’s and NCO’s were eligible for the fourth class award while all ranks were eligible for the other three classes. Authorization for rendering the awards came directly from SS-Reichführer Heinrich Himmler’s office. Of Note: Personnel serving with the Allgemeine-SS, (General-SS), and the SS-SD, SS-Sicherheitsdienst und Sicherheitspolizei, (SS-Security Service and Security Police), were not eligible for the SS long service awards and long serving personnel were awarded the NSDAP’s Faithful Service Decoration if eligible. Also Of Note: The SS Long Service Awards were the first awards to utilize a swastika alone and not in conjunction with the national eagle. This example is the third class award for eight years service.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $750.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Polizei Eighteen Year Long Service Award 1938
Item #: VF4932

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Second class, die struck alloy construction award with a silver finish for 18 years service. The award is in the form of a Pattée style cross with a central, vertically oval, centerpiece. The obverse centerpiece features an embossed oak-leaf wreath encompassing a national eagle with out-stretched wings, clutching a canted, wreathed swastika on a smooth background field. The eagles wings extended beyond the oak-leaf wreath onto the horizontal arms of the cross. The reverse centerpiece has embossed block Latin script, "Für Treue Dienst in der Polizei", (For Loyal Service in the Police), also on a smooth background field. The arms of the cross have a slightly textured background field with a smooth, raised, outer border edging. The silver finish is fully retained and is still quite clean and bright. The ribbon suspension ring and medal loop are both intact. The award comes complete with a piece of original, horizontally ribbed, cornflower blue, moire rayon ribbon and embroidered polizei eagle ribbon bar device. Mint
On January 30TH 1938 Adolf Hitler instituted a series of Long Service Awards to recognize loyal long service in the police. The award was originally issued in three classes with the first class award for twenty-five years service, the second class award for eighteen years service and the third class award for eight years service. Allegedly another class of the award was introduced in August 1944 to recognize forty years loyal service and consisted of a golden metal cypher with "40" encompassed by an oak-leaf wreath to be affixed to the ribbon of the twenty-five year service award.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $200.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Polizei Twenty-Five Year Long Service Award 1938
Item #: vf4931

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First class, die struck alloy construction award with a fire gilted finish for twenty-five years service. The award is in the form of a Pattée style cross with a central, vertically oval, centerpiece. The obverse centerpiece features an embossed oak-leaf wreath encompassing a national eagle with out-stretched wings, clutching a canted, wreathed swastika on a smooth background field. The eagles wings extended beyond the oak-leaf wreath onto the horizontal arms of the cross. The reverse centerpiece has embossed block Latin script, "Für Treue Dienst in der Polizei", (For Loyal Service in the Police), also on a smooth background field. The arms of the cross have a slightly textured background field with a smooth, raised, outer border edging. The fire gilted finish is fully retained and is still quite clean and bright. The ribbon suspension ring and medal loop are both intact. The award comes complete with a piece of original, horizontally ribbed, cornflower blue, moire rayon ribbon and embroidered polizei eagle ribbon bar device. Mint
On January 30TH 1938 Adolf Hitler instituted a series of Long Service Awards to recognize loyal long service in the police. The award was originally issued in three classes with the first class award for twenty-five years service, the second class award for eighteen years service and the third class award for eight years service. Allegedly another class of the award was introduced in August 1944 to recognize forty years loyal service and consisted of a golden metal cypher with "40" encompassed by an oak-leaf wreath to be affixed to the ribbon of the twenty-five year service award.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $250.00 USD

WWII Patriotic Marine Corps Celluloid Pin
Item #: VF4930

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Vintage 1940's celluloid plastic US Marine Corps pin with moving arms and legs. Measures 2 3/4" long. No breaks to plastic in very good condition
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $75.00 USD

WWII Patriotic Uncle Sam Celluloid Pin
Item #: VF4929

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Vintage 1940's celluloid plastic Uncle Sam pin with moving arms and legs. Measures 2 3/4" long. No breaks to plastic in very good condition
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $95.00 USD

WWII NAZI German Eagle Order Verdienstmedaille Merit Medal Maker “29”
Item #: VF4928

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Beautiful example of a German Eagle Order Merit Medal (Verdienstmedaille des Deutschen Adlers) in bronze. On loop for suspension - marked "29” for an unknown maker with its period original ribbon featuring an horizontal pinback. Measuring 38.03 mm in diameter and weighing 21.9 grams in overall extremely fine condition.
The Series of the Order of the German Eagle was originally instituted by Hitler on May 1ST 1937, in varying degrees for award to foreign political dignitaries. The award was modified and other "degrees" were added in 1939, and again in 1943. The last version of these awards were designated "class" instead of "degree". Also in 1939 crossed swords were added to the award when it was to be issued to personnel who had displayed distinguished military merit. The Medal of Merit was the lowest class in the series.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $450.00 USD

Order of the German Eagle Merit Medal with Swords in Silver Official Vienna Mint
Item #: VF4927

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(Deutsche Verdienstmedaille des Deutsche Adlers mit Schwertern). A round silver medal, the obverse depicting the outline of the Order of the German Eagle. The reverse inscribed "Deutsche Verdienstmedaille” in block letters with crossed swords fastened to the top of the medal. On a loop for suspension from its period original ribbon featuring a horizontal pinback. Maker marked "Hauptmünzamt Wien”, with a Vienna city assay mark, and "835” for silver content. Measuring 38.15 mm in diameter and weighing 23.1 grams. In overall extremely fine condition.
The Series of the Order of the German Eagle was originally instituted by Hitler on May 1ST 1937, in varying degrees for award to foreign political dignitaries. The award was modified and other "degrees" were added in 1939, and again in 1943. The last version of these awards were designated "class" instead of "degree". Also in 1939 crossed swords were added to the award when it was to be issued to personnel who had displayed distinguished military merit.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $600.00 USD

PRE WWII Nazi German Nun Erst Recht Golden Pin
Item #: VF4925

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This example is a golden NUN ERST RECHT (NOW FIRST RIGHT) members pin measuring roughly 30 1/2 mm in diameter, die struck, alloy construction badge features three color enamel work and a bright fire gilted finish. The badge features a slightly recessed, fire gilted, embossed, outer oak-leaf wreath encompassing a fine white enameled inner border stripe which encircles a semi-translucent red, circular inner border with inset block Latin script, "NUN ERST RECHT", encompassing a white enameled central field with a canted, black enameled swastika. The fire gilted finish to the outside oak-leaf wreath is retained about 95% with minor age dulling. The hollow reverse of the badge is not marked with Pin complete. Shows the expected age, period use and wear. A scarce Abzeichen der Burdezeit (Badge of the Burden Times), first made and worn when the NSDAP was banned in November 1923 after the failed Putsch as a way to display support to the party without breaking the law because the badge did not display the party name. The swastika, not yet recognised as an official Nazi symbol, was allowed on the badge. The Weimar government issued another decree in late January 1924 that banned these badges. The ban was lifted in February of 1926. This motto badge was made as late as the early 1930's.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $550.00 USD

WWII US 101st Airborne Type 7 1 Piece Greenback Variant
Item #: VF4924

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This is a very nice original 1 piece Type 7 101st Airborne Division green back patch that has been removed from the uniform.
The 101st Airborne Division was activated 16 August 1942 at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. On 19 August 1942, its first commander, Major General William C. Lee, promised his new recruits that the 101st had "no history but had a rendezvous with destiny." In his first address to his soldiers the day the division was born, Lee read General Order Number 5 dated 19 August 1942: The 101st Airborne Division, which was activated on 16 August 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, has no history, but it has a rendezvous with destiny. Due to the nature of our armament, and the tactics in which we shall perfect ourselves, we shall be called upon to carry out operations of far-reaching military importance and we shall habitually go into action when the need is immediate and extreme. Let me call your attention to the fact that our badge is the great American eagle. This is a fitting emblem for a division that will crush its enemies by falling upon them like a thunderbolt from the skies. The history we shall make, the record of high achievement we hope to write in the annals of the American Army and the American people, depends wholly and completely on the men of this division. Each individual, each officer and each enlisted man, must therefore regard himself as a necessary part of a complex and powerful instrument for the overcoming of the enemies of the nation. Each, in his own job, must realize that he is not only a means, but an indispensable means for obtaining the goal of victory. It is, therefore, not too much to say that the future itself, in whose molding we expect to have our share, is in the hands of the soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division.
 
D-day

The 101st Airborne Division's objectives were to secure the four causeway exits behind Utah Beach, destroy a German coastal artillery battery at Saint-Martin-de-Varreville, capture buildings nearby at Mésières believed used as barracks and a command post for the artillery battery, capture the Douve River lock at La Barquette (opposite Carentan), capture two footbridges spanning the Douve at La Porte opposite Brévands, destroy the highway bridges over the Douve at Saint-Côme-du-Mont, and secure the Douve River valley. In the process units also disrupted German communications, established roadblocks to hamper the movement of German reinforcements, established a defensive line between the beachhead and Valognes, cleared the area of the drop zones to the unit boundary at Les Forges, and linked up with the 82nd Airborne Division.
 
Operation Market Garden
The plan, as outlined by Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, required the seizure by airborne forces of several bridges on the Highway 69 across the Maas (Meuse River) and two arms of the Rhine (the Waal and the Lower Rhine), as well as several smaller canals and tributaries. Crossing these bridges would allow British armoured units to outflank the Siegfried Line, advance into northern Germany, and encircle the Ruhr, Germany's industrial heartland, thus ending the war. This meant the large-scale use of Allied airborne forces, including both the 82nd and 101st. The operation was initially successful. Several bridges between Eindhoven and Nijmegen were captured by the 82nd and 101st. The 101st met little resistance and captured most of their initial objectives by the end of 17 September. However, the demolition of the division's primary objective, a bridge over the Wilhelmina Canal at Son, delayed the capture of the main road bridge over the Maas until 20 September. Faced with the loss of the bridge at Son, the 101st unsuccessfully attempted to capture a similar bridge a few kilometers away at Best but found the approach blocked. Other units continued moving to the south and eventually reached the northern end of Eindhoven. At 06:00 hours on 18 September the Irish Guards resumed the advance while facing determined resistance from German infantry and tanks. Around noon the 101st Airborne were met by the lead reconnaissance units from XXX Corps. At 16:00 radio contact alerted the main force that the Son bridge had been destroyed and requested that a Bailey bridge be brought forward. By nightfall the Guards Armoured Division had established itself in the Eindhoven area however transport columns were jammed in the packed streets of the town and were subjected to German aerial bombardment during the night. XXX Corps engineers, supported by German prisoners of war, constructed a class 40 Bailey bridge within 10 hours across the Wilhelmina Canal. The longest sector of the highway secured by the 101st Airborne Division later became known as "Hell's Highway".
 
Battle Of The Bulge
The Ardennes Offensive (16 December 1944 – 25 January 1945) was a major German offensive launched towards the end of World War II through the forested Ardennes Mountains region of Belgium. Germany's planned goal for these operations was to split the British and American Allied line in half, capturing Antwerp, Belgium in the process, and then proceeding to encircle and destroy the entire British 21st Army Group and all 12th U.S. Army Group units north of the German advance, forcing the Western Allies to negotiate a peace treaty in the Axis Powers’ favor as a result. In order to reach Antwerp before the Allies could regroup and bring their superior air power to bear, German mechanized forces had to seize all the major highways through eastern Belgium. Because all seven of the main roads in the Ardennes converged on the small town of Bastogne, control of its crossroads was vital to the success or failure of the German attack. Despite several notable signs in the weeks preceding the attack, the Ardennes Offensive achieved virtually complete surprise. By the end of the second day of battle, it became apparent that the 28th Infantry Division was near collapse. Maj. Gen. Troy H. Middleton, commander of VIII Corps, ordered part of his armored reserve, Combat Command B of the 10th Armored Division to Bastogne. Meanwhile, Gen. Eisenhower ordered forward the SHAEF reserve, composed of the 82nd and 101st Airborne, which were stationed at Reims. Both divisions were alerted on the evening of 17 December, and not having organic transport, began arranging trucks for movement forward. The 82nd, longer in reserve and thus better re-equipped, moved out first. The 101st left Camp Mourmelon on the afternoon of 18 December, with the order of march the division artillery, division trains, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), 506th PIR, 502nd PIR, and 327th Glider Infantry. Much of the convoy was conducted at night in drizzle and sleet, using headlights despite threat of air attack to speed the movement, and at one point the combined column stretched from Bouillon, Belgium, back to Reims. The 101st Airborne was routed to Bastogne, located 107 miles away on a 1463 ft (445m) high plateau, while the 82nd Airborne took up positions further north to block the critical advance of Kampfgruppe Peiper toward Werbomont, Belgium. The 705th Tank Destroyer Battalion, in reserve sixty miles to the north, was ordered to Bastogne to provide anti-tank support to the armorless 101st Airborne on the 18th and arrived late the next evening. The first elements of the 501st PIR entered the division assembly area four miles west of Bastogne shortly after midnight of 19 December, and by 0900 the entire division had arrived.
By 21 December, the German forces had surrounded Bastogne, which was defended by both the 101st Airborne and Combat Command B of the 10th Armored Division. Conditions inside the perimeter were tough—most of the medical supplies and medical personnel had been captured on 19 December. CCB of the 10th Armored Division, severely weakened by losses in delaying the German advance, formed a mobile "fire brigade" of 40 light and medium tanks (including survivors of CCR of the 9th Armored Division, which had been destroyed while delaying the Germans, and eight replacement tanks found unassigned in Bastogne). Three artillery battalions, including the all-black 969th Field Artillery Battalion, were commandeered by the 101st and formed a temporary artillery group. Each had 12 155 mm howitzers, providing the division with heavy firepower in all directions restricted only by its limited ammunition supply (By 22 December artillery ammunition was restricted to 10 rounds per gun per day.) The weather cleared the next day, however, and supplies (primarily ammunition) were dropped over four of the next five days.
Despite several determined German attacks, the perimeter held. The German commander, Generalleutnant Heinrich Freiherr von Lüttwitz, requested Bastogne's surrender. When General Anthony McAuliffe, now acting commander of the 101st, was told, a frustrated McAuliffe responded, "Nuts!" After turning to other pressing issues, his staff reminded him that they should reply to the German demand. One officer (Harry W. O. Kinnard, then a lieutenant colonel) recommended that McAuliffe's initial reply should be "tough to beat". Thus McAuliffe wrote on the paper delivered to the Germans: "NUTS!" That reply had to be explained, both to the Germans and to non-American Allies.
Both of the two panzer divisions of the XLVII Panzer Corps moved forward from Bastogne after 21 December, leaving only one panzergrenadier regiment of the Panzer-Lehr-Division to assist the 26th Volksgrenadier Division in attempting to capture the crossroads. The 26th VG received additional armor and panzergrenadier reinforcements on Christmas Eve to prepare for its final assault, to take place on Christmas Day. Because it lacked sufficient armor and troops and the 26th VG Division was near exhaustion, the XLVII Panzer Corps concentrated the assault on several individual locations on the west side of perimeter in sequence rather than launching one simultaneous attack on all sides. The assault, despite initial success by German tanks in penetrating the American line, was defeated and virtually all of the German tanks involved were destroyed. The next day, 26 December, the spearhead of General George S. Patton's U.S. Third Army relief force, the 4th Armored Division, broke through the German lines and opened a corridor to Bastogne, ending the siege. The division got the nickname "The Battered Bastards of the Bastion of Bastogne". Despite their desperate situation before the relief by General Patton, no member of the 101st Airborne has ever agreed that the division needed to be rescued. 
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $250.00 USD

WWI US Army 45th Infantry Division Wool Shoulder Patch
Item #: VF4923

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Beautiful condition WW1 45th Infantry Division wool shoulder sleeve insignia. Absolutely stone mint condition. 

History
With the outbreak of World War I, troops of the National Guard were formed into the units which exist today, with the Colorado Guard forming the 157th Infantry Regiment, the Arizona Guard forming the 158th Infantry Regiment, and the New Mexico Guard forming the 120th Engineer Regiment. These units were attached to the 40th Infantry Division and deployed to France where they were used as "depot" forces to provide replacements for front-line units. They returned home at the end of the war. The Oklahoma Guard units that would later become the 179th Infantry Regiment and 180th Infantry Regiment were assigned to the 36th Infantry Division and would earn a combat participation credit during the Meuse-Argonne Campaign in France as the 142nd Infantry.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $145.00 USD

1920's 14th Infantry Division Patch On Wool
Item #: VF4922

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This is a very nice original early 14th Infantry Division Wolverine patch on wool. This patch probably dates from the 1920's and in mint condition.
"Popularly known as the "Wolverine Division." Insignia, a green shield upon which is superimposed a yellow disc containing the head of a wolverine in black. Organized at Camp Custer, Michigan, on July 29, 1918. The 10th and 40th Regular Army Infantry Regiments were ordered to Camp Custer in the latter part of July as a part of the 14th Division and these regiments furnished the nucleus for the organization of the other infantry units of the division. The artillery brigade was organized on August 10, 1918, and training for overseas service was begun immediately.

The 214th Regiment of Engineers was organized at Camp Forest, Ga., on August 14, 1918, and training for overseas service was began immediately. The 214th Regiment of Engineers was organized at Camp Forest, Ga., on August 14, 1918, and joined the division at Camp Custer on October 31, 1918. The 214th Field Signal Battalion was organized on July 13, 1918 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and arrived at Camp Custer on July 25, 1918. All other units of the division were organized and undergoing intensive training at Camp Custer by the first week in November and at the time of the signing of the armistice the division was being rounded into shape for service at the front. Demobilization of the division was commenced January 27, 1919, and by the last of February all units not belonging to the Regular Army had been demobilized.

Commanders of division: Col. Sam. Burkhardt, July 28 to Sept. 5, 1918; Brig. Gen. H. L. Laubach, Sept. 5 to Nov. 9, 1918; Maj.Gen. Grote Hutcheson, Nov. 9 until demobilization.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 14th Hqs. Troop, 40th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 27th Inf. Brig. (10th and 77th Inf. Regts, 41st Machine Gun Bn.), 28th Inf. Brig (40th and 78th Inf. Regts, 42nd Machine Gun Bn), 14th Fld. Arty. Brig. (40th, 41st, and 42nd Fld. Arty. Regts. 14th Trench Mortar Battery, 214th Engr. Regt., 214th Engr. Train, 214th Fld. Sig. Bn., 14th Train Hqs and M.P., 14th Supply Train, 14th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. 253, 254, 255, and 256).
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $100.00 USD

WWII US Army Airborne 541stJump Oval
Item #: VF4921

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Original WWII 541st PIR jump oval direct embroidered on felt. 

The 541st Parachute Infantry Regiment Is Born
The 541st Parachute Infantry Regiment was activated 12 August 1943 at Fort Benning, Georgia, under the command of Colonel Ducat M. McEntee and his Executive Officer Major Harley N. Trice. The unit was filled with men who had already completed Basic and Infantry Training, but were yet to complete Jump School. The men who filled out the unit's ranks were of a high caliber, all had scored exceptionally well on their Army Entrance Exams; all were volunteers. One of the original members of the unit was famed 101st Airborne author Donald R. Burgett, who later participated in all the World War II battles of A Company 506th Parachute Infantry. Pvt. Burgett's first impressions of the 541st were to meet the Parachute School instructors who would take them through the four-week program, after a five-mile run and a full morning of calisthenics, men were already beginning to fall out. The Regiment was taking form and only the determined would survive! Any man who quit was immediately removed and banished to the Military Police, a fate deemed shameful to a paratrooper who considered their duty to challenge the authority of the MPs every chance they got. The men completed Jump School as a unit, but not without casualties. One planeload of prospective paratroopers crashed in a ball of fire, killing all on board. Others, Pvt Burgett included suffered Jump Injuries, which put a halt to their training until they were well enough to continue, after which they would catch up with the unit, which moved out to Camp Mackall upon completing the Parachute School.
The Knollwood Maneuvers, North Carolina, December 1943
By late December 1943 the Army High Command had become disenchanted with the idea of Parachute Troops, to the point where they were contemplating dissolving the existing Airborne Divisions in favour of independent Battalions, which could be attached to regular Divisions for use in sabotage and deception operations. The 82nd Airborne Division had jumped into Sicily at this point and a mixture of misdrops and friendly fire had the High Command concerned about the practicality of large scale airdrops of troopers. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, later Overall Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces, famously said: "I do not believe in the Airborne Division..."
In order to decide whether to keep or disband the Airborne Units it was decided to hold a 2-week maneuver to assess the fate of Airborne Troops, this was the Knollwood Maneuvers. By this time the 541st was a part of the Strategic Reserve held in the United States. The Regiment was chosen alongside the 11th and 17th Airborne Divisions to participate in the Maneuvers. The future of Airborne Troops was resting on the shoulders of these men and they approached the task with determination to preserve their branch of service.
Despite foul weather the maneuvers were a resounding success and the future of Airborne Troopers was safe. The 541st performed particularly well, scoring high marks and making a good account of themselves.
However, despite their good performance and obviously being ready for movement overseas, the men of the 541st were still held in Reserve, watching as their counterparts in the 11th and 17th Airborne Divisions were deployed overseas. To further add to their disappointment the 541st was tasked with providing replacements for the 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions overseas. As a result, many original members of the 541st were on hand to participate in the Invasion of Normandy.
Strategic Reserve, USA
After the end of the Knollwood Maneuvers, training continued for the 541st. A new group of men came into the outfit, to replace those lost to units overseas, and the Regiment began a 13-week Airborne Infantry Training Cycle. One of these men was Billy Tom Lusk, a young draftee, later a Sergeant of a Machine Gun Squad, who had taken Infantry Basic Training, volunteered for the Army Air Corps, been recalled to the Infantry and volunteered for the Paratroopers to get out of the 71st Infantry Division and get overseas and into the action. He remembers spending most of 1944 doing problems in the field, Jumping onto the DZ on Monday and staying until Friday of Saturday. He was not happy with the assignment, remembering that the unit never went to the field without sustaining a few casualties from friendly fire, as well as the inherent jump injuries. Lusk became disenchanted with the unit and when it became obvious that they weren't getting overseas he volunteered for OCS. The war ended before he graduated, so he dropped out and discharged, having never gotten overseas as he wished.
The Regiment moved back and forward between Fort Benning and Camp Mackall, demonstrating Airborne Tactics for dignitaries, developing new tactics and technique, and providing cadre for new Airborne Units being raised, like the 13th Airborne Division.
Then in July 1945 the Regiment was alerted for movement to the Pacific Theatre of Operations, pending an assignment to the 11th Airborne Division.
The Pacific Theatre
The Regiment arrived at Manila in the Philippines waiting to be attached to the 11th Airborne, which was preparing to Jump on the Japanese Homeland. However much to the disappointment of the men of the 541st, the Regiment was deactivated and absorbed into the 11th Airborne ranks.
The 541st, after three years of dedication and waiting, was no more.
Soon thereafter the Atomic Bomb was dropped and the Second World War came to an end. The 11th Airborne Division moved to Mainland Japan as an occupation force, taking the men of the former 541st with it.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $95.00 USD