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WWII Nazi German Commemorative Leaded Crystal Ein Volk Ein Reich Ein Führer! Glass W/ Bohemian Lion
Item #: VF4843

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Early, 1938 commemorative glass One people, one Reich, one Führer! Being made of clear leaded crystal that is amber glazed featuring a two-tailed, crowned Bohemian coat of arms lion with an inscription on the top edge 'Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer!' '1/10/1938'. This glass is believed to be a given for donation for the German population in the Sudetenland. Glass is in German fashion, very well made and measures roughly 4 .5 inches tall. There is a couple of minor chips to the edge of the rim otherwise MINT!
Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Your Price $110.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Luftwaffe DAK Tropical Knee High Boots Tropen Stiefel
Item #: VF4842

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The multi-piece, tan canvas, blackened and tan leather construction, knee high, Luftwaffe style boots with sheet metal fittings, are roughly, 15 1/2" tall from the top of the heel to the top of the back calf section. The calves of the boots are constructed in woven tan canvas with a dual-ply, central, vertical, tan leather reinforcement spine to the reverse. The foot and interior ankle portions of the boots are constructed in four, brown leather panels with a large, forward, foot panel and a smaller interior ankle and two smaller heel panels. The boots have a vertical, front opening with seven, parallel pair of black painted, magnetic sheet metal, lace up grommets to the lower section positioned below a roughly, 10" tall, overlapping canvas panel with an internal, protective canvas, dust flap. The tan fabric laces are included. One side of the overlapping, front opening panel has a inset, vertically oval, opened center, sheet metal grommet to both the top and bottom edges with a corresponding long, tan leather closure strap machine stitched to the lower outside calves and corresponding, leather reinforced, blued, sheet metal gripper buckle to the outer top edges of each boot. The closure straps were to be inserted through the bottom grommet, run up the interior of the front opening, inserted through the top grommet and buckled for a secure closure. The reverse of the overlapping, front opening, panels have tan leather reinforcement strips to each side and a riveted on, internal, vertical, sheet metal stiffening panel to one side. The boots have stacked leather heels and forward soles. with the heels having inset, steel "horseshoe" plates. The instep has the typical diamond shaped wooden retaining dowels. The interior top edge of each boot are trimmed with a strip of reinforcing tan leather. The interior leather reinforcement strips are both well marked with impressed numerals, and the interior calves both have faint, ink stamped numerals. The boots are in overall, very good condition with areas of moderate wear and staining. The boots are roughly size 10. Seldom encountered, Luftwaffe, knee-high tropical boots.
In late 1940, with the impending German entrance into the North African campaign, the army quickly developed and issued tropical uniforms, footwear and equipment in time for DAK, Deutsches Afrika Korps, (German Africa Corps), personnel’s arrival in Tripoli in February 1941. The army pattern tropical footwear consisted of a khaki/olive canvas and brown leather construction knee high, lace up, boots and short, lace up, ankle boots as it was determined the canvas would wear better in the tropical climate. At the same time the Luftwaffe also developed and introduced their own version of the tropical uniform and equipment independently from the other branches of service but utilized the army’s versions of the tropical footwear. Besides the army’s standard issue, tropical, knee high, lace up boots another similar, knee high type of boot was produced that eliminated the upper laces and replaced them with a fold over panel with dual closure strap and corresponding buckles. Although the introductory regulations for the tropical, knee high, non-lace up boots is unknown it is believed they were produced specifically for the Luftwaffe. Officers and certain senior NCO ranks were responsible for purchasing their own uniforms and as a result were allotted a clothing allowance through the Luftwaffe’s Verkaufabteilung, (Air-Force Sales Department), system. The Officers and certain senior NCO’s could choose to purchase their uniforms from the armed forces clothing depots or to privately purchase garments of higher quality. Although enlisted personnel were issued their uniforms from government supplies they were also permitted to purchase privately tailored uniforms although the price may have been restrictive.
Shipping Weight: 7 lbs
Your Price $1,500.00 USD

WWII Nazi German M44 Ankle Boots Bergschuhe
Item #: VF4841

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Smooth, multi-panel, mid-brown leather construction ankle boots. Unissued pair in superb condition. Very nicely Rbnr# marked. Roughly a size 9. Nice!!
Besides the helmet, the tall marching boot is probably one of the most instantly recognizable items of the German military. However the German concern with leather shortages was evident as early as September 1939 when issue of the traditional tall leather marching boot was restricted to personnel serving in the field. Regulations in November 1939 shortened the tall leather marching boot in an attempt to conserve leather. In early 1940 the lace-up ankle boots were first introduced as a further leather conservation method and by 1941 the ankle boot was issued to all new recruits in place of the marching boot. By 1943 with escalating leather shortages the gaiter’s and lace up ankle boots were issued to all replacement personnel and manufacture of the tall marching boots was discontinued altogether. Of Note: Although the short lace-up ankle boots were completely serviceable they proved quite unpopular with the troops and a great deal of effort was put into the care and maintenance of the tall marching boots by those personnel who had retained them.
Shipping Weight: 5 lbs
Your Price $480.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 3RD Fusiller Battalion 9TH Company Bayonet Ersatztroddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4839

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 3rd Fusiller Battalion, 9th Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 1ST Battalion 1st Company Bayonet Ersatztroddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4838

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 1ST Battalion, 1ST Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 1st Battalion 2nd Company Bayonet Ersatztroddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4837

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 1st Battalion, 2nd Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 1ST Battalion 4TH Company Bayonet Ersatztroddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4836

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 2nd Battalion, 7th Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 2nd Battalion 7TH Company Bayonet Troddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4835

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 2nd Battalion, 7th Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 3rd Battalion 5TH Company Bayonet Troddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4834

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 3rd Battalion, 5th Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 1st Battalion 2nd Company Bayonet Troddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4833

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 1st Battalion, 2nd Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 2nd Battalion 6TH Company Bayonet Troddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4832

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 2nd Battalion, 6th Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 1st Battalion 4TH Company Bayonet Troddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4831

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 1st Battalion, 4th Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German 1st Battalion 5TH Company Bayonet Troddel Seitengewehr Troddel
Item #: VF4830

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A very nice example of an EM’s troddel for the 1st Battalion, 5th Company. The 35cm long strap shows minimal wear with the tassel showing minimal wear.
Bayonet knots were originally introduced in the Prussian army in 1808, and continued to be worn with the Dress uniform, as a tradition and identifying item through WWI, the Weimar Republic and on into the Third Reich, with minor modifications. For enlisted personnel the main components of, strap, slide, stem, crown, and ball were woven or pleated cotton in different colors representing which unit within a regiment the wearer served. The basic regiment consisted of three Battalions with a Headquarters unit and four Companies each, with two additional Regimental or Headquarters Companies. This resulted in a colorful array of bayonet knots within a regiment with twelve or more assorted color combinations. NCO personnel wore a different type of bayonet knot, that did not show association with a particular unit, but indicated position.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $150.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Wehrmacht Afrika Korps Tropical SD M40 Camouflaged Combat Helmet Stahlhelm M35
Item #: JT513

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The stamped, sheet steel construction helmet retains about 95% of its camouflage over-paint in tan. This single decal helmet shows minor crazing over the paint where the decal is, clearly showing the decal underneath the camo paint. All three liner retaining rivets are intact. The interior of the helmet has a M31 leather liner with all eight fingers intact. The interior, reverse, neck guard apron has a stamped serial number, "427". The interior, left side, apron has the stamped manufacturer’s code and size,"ET64" indicating manufacture by Eisen-und Hüttenwerke, AG Thale/Harz, size 64. The helmet comes with its original chinstrap. Nice looking field worn camo.
The first "modern" steel helmets were introduced by the French army in early 1915 and were shortly followed by the British army later that year. With plans on the drawing board, experimental helmets in the field, ("Gaede" helmet), and some captured French and British helmets the German army began tests for their own steel helmet at the Kummersdorf Proving Grounds in November, and in the field in December 1915. An acceptable pattern was developed and approved and production began at Eisen-und Hüttenwerke, AG Thale/Harz, in the spring of 1916. These first modern M16 helmets evolved into the M18 helmets by the end of WWI. The M16 and M18 helmets remained in usage through-out the Weimar Reichswehr, (National Defence {Force}), (Circa 1919-1933), era and on into the early years of the Third Reich until the development of the smaller, lighter M35 style helmet in June 1935. In an effort to reduced construction time and labor costs minor modifications were introduced in March 1940 resulting in the M40 helmet. Further construction modifications were undertaken in August 1942 resulting in the M42 helmet. Originally the Third Reich national tri-color helmet decal was introduced on March 14TH 1933 for wear on the left side of the helmet to replace the Reichswehr era state shield insignia. Regulations of February 17TH 1934 introduced the Wehrmacht, (Armed Forces), eagle decal and the national tri-color decal was shifted to the right side of the helmet with the Wehrmacht eagle decal positioned on the left hand side. Regulations of March 21ST 1940 dictated that the national tri-color decal was to be removed from all helmets and further regulations of August 28TH 1943 abolished the Wehrmacht eagle decal and dictated that it was also to be removed from all helmets although the directives were not completely adhered to.
 
Shipping Weight: 6 lbs
Your Price $2,450.00 USD

WWII German Nazi Luftwaffe M43 Other Ranks Cap
Item #: VF4826

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Luftwaffe blue/gray wool/rayon blend construction cap, features fold down side and back panels with a scalloped front with two pebbled, magnetic sheet metal buttons closure at front center. Buttons both retain 100% of their original Luftwaffe blue/gray paint and have original stitching. Cap has an extended cloth covered visor with internal cardboard stiffener and raised lip to top of forward edge. Front center of cap has a second pattern, machine embroidered Luftwaffe eagle in silver/gray threads on a Luftwaffe blue/grey wool base. Just below the eagle is a machine woven national tri-color cockade. Insignia is nicely machine stitched to cap. Interior of cap is fully lined in blue rayon. Lining is well marked with a ink stamped size, "58". excellent near mint example.
Following the army’s lead the Luftwaffe introduced the M43 field cap on September 27TH 1943 to replace the Flyer's and Mountain caps then in use. The design of the M43 field cap was based on the earlier M42 Feldmütze, (Overseas cap), and the Mountain Troopers Bergmütze, (Mountain Cap), with minor variations. The insignia on the caps included the Luftwaffe style national eagle and the circular, black, white, and red national tri-color cockade as introduced on March 14TH 1933. The Luftwaffe pattern national eagle was originally introduced for wear by Fliegerschaft, (Pilot Base), personnel of the DLV, on August 18TH 1934 and was officially adopted for wear by all Luftwaffe personnel on March 1ST 1935. The original, short winged, first pattern national eagle was utilized until a, slightly modified, second pattern national eagle was introduced in late 1936 or early 1937. Regulations dictated that the national eagle was to be worn on almost all headgear and on the right breast of almost all uniforms with a few minor exceptions. Officer’s ranks were distinguished by piping on the crown of the cap with silver piping for the ranks of Leutnant to Oberst and gilt piping for General Officer’s ranks of Generalmajor to Reichsmarschall while EM/NCO’s caps were not piped. Further regulations also dictated that the buttons on the cap were also to be an indicator of rank with blue/grey buttons for EM/NCO’s, silver for Field and Company grade officers and gilt for General’s ranks but this was not strictly adhered to. Officers and certain senior NCO ranks were responsible for purchasing their own caps and as a result were allotted a clothing allowance through the Luftwaffe’s Verkaufsabteilung, (Air-Force Sales Department), system. The Officers and certain senior NCO’s could choose to purchase their caps from the armed forces clothing depots or to privately purchase visor caps of higher quality. Although enlisted personnel were issued their caps from government supplies they were also permitted to purchase privately tailored caps although the price may have been restrictive.
Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Your Price $390.00 USD

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